Australia New Supercomputer

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The new machine will go into operation in November and will be located in the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) of the Australian National University (ANU). 

australia new supercomputer

The machine, named Gadi-Ngunnawal, is by no means the first supercomputer of its kind in the world, but it will keep the 5,000 researchers who use it up to date. It will keep the 5,000 researchers using it on the new machine up to date and keep them up to date with computer science and technology. 

To ensure the best outcome for the NCI, Fujitsu has put together a solution based on its own technology, while the technology has been sourced from a variety of companies in Australia and around the world, including the Australian National University, the University of New South Wales and the Australian National Institute of Technology. 

To ensure the best outcome for the NCI, Fujitsu has put together a solution based on its own technology, while the technology has been sourced from a variety of companies in Australia and around the world, including the Australian National University, the University of New South Wales and the Australian National Institute of Technology. This robust, industry-leading technology approach is designed to sustain the need for Australian research for years to come. The new machine will keep the 5,000 researchers who use it up to date. 

This robust, industry-leading technology approach is designed to sustain the need for Australian research for years to come. Gadi will drive Australia’s most important research and strive to solve some of the most complex and pressing challenges facing the world today. 

Organizations such as CSIRO, Geosciences Australia, and the Bureau of Meteorology will benefit from faster speeds and higher capacity compared to existing supercomputers. 

The Australian National University said the upgrade will power some of Australia’s most important research. The opportunity to lead this important project is particularly gratifying as it helps to continue the long-standing commitment of the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) based at the Australian National University (ANU). With this expansion of critical infrastructure, Australia will continue to play a leading role in addressing the biggest global challenges. 

The current supercomputer Raijin was commissioned by Fujitsu in 2013, and one of the university’s earliest supercomputers was also shipped in the 1980s. The NCI named the new supercomputer Gadi, meaning “search,” in honor of its creator, the late Dr. G.A. “Gadi” Gadhi. 

The use of an Aboriginal name is particularly significant because Fujitsu has reaffirmed its support for indigenous communities in its Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), launched in 2018. 

The new machine, called Gadi, will replace the existing Raijin, also built by Fujitsu in 2012. The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) will operate Gadis and will be replaced by an existing machine by November 2019. s first supercomputer for the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) at the University of Queensland. 

The new machine, based at the Australian National University in Canberra and operated by the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI), will offer 10 times the speed and computing power of the existing Raijin machine and 10,000 times more computing capacity for Australian researchers. The new supercomputer is called Gadi, which means “search” in Japanese, and is the first of its kind in the world. This project is supported by the Australian government with 70 million dollars, but Fujitsu was not able to deliver the contract value. 

In November 2019, Gadi will replace NCI’s current Raijin supercomputer, which was already provided by Fujitsu in 2012. It will be fully operational by the end of 2018 with the first tests taking place at the Australian National University in Canberra and the University of Queensland in Queensland, Australia. Phase 1 of GADI will begin on 18 November 2019, when it will be made available to its more than 4000 users in a transitional phase. 

Mark Stickells, Managing Director of Pawsey, said: “In response to COVID 19, the rapid advancement of relevant science can lead to real public health outcomes, and NCI is proud of its role in this initiative, which seeks rapid professional support at a time of great need. The rapid deployment of cloud resources has resulted in our staff working over the last two weeks to deploy GADI at the Australian National University and the University of Queensland in Queensland, Australia. We work closely with users to integrate the applications of hundreds of projects into their new system. 

Research projects will have access to largely Pawsey-Nimbus allocations, with a focus on identifying other needs, including supporting resources such as data storage, data processing, and data analysis. Pawleys Perth is a member of the GADI team at the Australian National University and the University of Queensland.

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